Create a System Restore Point

Discussion in 'Windows XP Help and Support' started by erolf910, Aug 4, 2019.

  1. erolf910

    erolf910

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    A restore point is extremely useful to save your PC's configuration so it can be restored later.
    It is useful in case your PC stops working properly, or you have received a virus or any other problems arise in your computer.

    Step 1: Find the System Restore Utility

    To do this, click Start All Programs ► Accessories ► System Tools ► System Restore

    Step 2: Creating the Restore Point

    A new Window should pop up. On the right side, tick Create a restore point and click Next.

    Step 3: Finalizing the Restore Point

    Go ahead and title the new restore point in the Restore point description box and click Create.

    After completing these steps, the restore point should complete either quickly or slowly depending on how much is being saved.
     
    erolf910, Aug 4, 2019
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  2. erolf910

    Elizabeth23

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    it is much better to use Erunt:

    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/erunt/

    much faster than system restore, it will create point at every restart or at any point you choose, restore folder is in c:/windows so that it can be reached with a boot disk if you cannot boot into windows.
     
    Elizabeth23, Aug 4, 2019
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    priscus likes this.
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  3. erolf910

    priscus

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    The ONLY time I have ever really needed it, RESTORE function kept me occupied, ie wasted about 15 minutes of my time, only to then finally declare "CANNOT BE RESTORED"! Had to do a data recovery using a different OS, then reinstall: not fun!

    Being cautions by nature, I still set restore points, but for greater protection, I like to keep disk images.

    So, I rate it 3 out of 10. Useful for backing out of an unsatisfactory state where something has been modified in a manner that you do not like, or is interfering with set up you had running previously. Less good to rescue you, when, for some unknown reason, system throws a wobbler, and is simply not working the way that it should.

    Also, this is my main defence against Ransomware!
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2019
    priscus, Aug 4, 2019
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  4. erolf910

    moviedown

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    hu
     
    moviedown, Aug 9, 2019
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  5. erolf910

    cornemuse

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    I only have one (computer) with 500 gig HDD that I go on line with. I prefer 160 G or less. With the 80's I have I must backup or run out of disk space, sooner or later. Never with a 1T drive! So much to lose in one fell swoop! And with W 10, lose 4-5-6-7-8 T's in a heartbeat. People tend to (with that much space) not backup their data as often. Thats why these (more & more of 'em) outfits are making huge killing$ recovering data from 'dead hdds'.

    (my 2¢) -c-
     
    cornemuse, Aug 9, 2019
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    Elizabeth23 likes this.
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